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Home Canadian Brothels decriminalized in Ontario, groups call for 'Nordic laws'

Brothels decriminalized in Ontario, groups call for 'Nordic laws'

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By Michael Swan
The Catholic Register
TORONTO (CCN)
The Ontario Court of Appeal.The Ontario Court of Appeal.
Now that Ontario's highest court has found most laws in the country concerning prostitution are unconstitutional, people on all sides of the debate are urging parliament to act.

In a landmark ruling likely to be appealed to the Supreme Court, the Ontario Court of Appeal rendered a decision on March 26 that legalizes brothels and allows prostitutes to hire protectors and other staff. Public soliciting and pimping remain illegal, but the court ruled that prostitutes have a constitutional right to work in safe environments.

The court suspended implementation of its decision for one year to give parliament time to amend the criminal code.

"The appeal court is correct in noting that parliament is free to propose a new, more charter-compliant law to address prostitution, including the possibility of addressing the exploitation inherent in this trade by pursuing clients," said Joanne McGarry, executive director of the Catholic Civil Rights League (CCRL), in a release. "We urge the Minister of Justice to explore these options."

REAL Women of Canada called the matter "urgent" and said the court decision should be "immediately appealed to the Supreme Court of Canada so that Parliament may ultimately decide."

The Evangelical Fellowship of Canada urged Parliament to draft new laws rather than simply amend existing laws. The Institute of Marriage and Family Canada (IMFC) also called for changes to prostitution laws.

Andrea Mrozek, IMFC's manager of research and communications, insisted, "Above all, the law should not in any way, shape, or form allow men to buy women's bodies. There will be no equality in Ontario so long as we sanction that."

Legalizing brothels won't make prostitution any safer, former prostitute and Sex Trade 101 founder Bridget Perrier told The Catholic Register.

Brothels are the ideal place for trafficking girls, many of them still children, into the sex trade, she said. "It just gives men who sell and procure women the upper hand."

Most of the groups unhappy with the court decision are urging "Nordic model" prostitution laws which treat women as victims and criminalize buying sex.

"Sweden criminalizes the buyer, understanding that an abuse of power is at play when largely male clients are able to buy their largely female human merchandise," said the IMFC.

"Sweden has seen a reduction in the number of prostitutes as well as the accompanying social ills, like human trafficking, drug use, and organized crime."

The Netherlands, where legal, regulated brothels are the norm, has seen an increase in organized crime and human trafficking, according to the IMFC.

The CCRL urges both approaches: criminalizing the purchase of sex and maintaining laws against common bawdy houses.

"It remains our opinion that the prohibition on keeping a bawdy house and on living off the avails are of some assistance in preventing the exploitation of a vulnerable population.

"All three provisions, as we stated in our affidavit, are in keeping with the moral values of the majority of Canadians," said McGarry.
 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 04 April 2012 07:46  

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